Bury

Bury Town Hall April 2017.jpg
Bury is located in Greater Manchester
Bury (/ˈbɛri/, locally also /ˈbʊrɪ/) is a town in Greater Manchester, England, on the River Irwell. It lies 5.5 miles (8.9 km) east of Bolton, 5.9 miles (9.5 km) west-southwest of Rochdale and 7.9 miles (12.7 km) north-northwest of Manchester. Bury is the largest administrative centre of the Metropolitan Borough of Bury, with an estimated population in 2015 of 78,723. The borough of Bury has a wider population of 187,474 as of 2011.

Historically part of Lancashire, Bury emerged in the Industrial Revolution as a mill town manufacturing textiles.

Bury is known for its open-air Bury Market and the traditional local dish, black pudding. The Manchester Metrolink tram system terminates in the town.

Bury resident Sir Robert Peel was a British Prime Minister who founded the Metropolitan Police and Conservative Party. The Peel Memorial stands outside Bury parish church and the Peel Monument stands on Holcombe Hill in Ramsbottom, overlooking the borough.

The name Bury (also earlier known as Buri and Byri) comes from an Old English word, meaning castle, stronghold or fort, an early form of modern English borough.

Bury was formed around the ancient market place but there is evidence of activity dating back to the period of Roman occupation. Bury Museum has a Roman urn containing a number of small bronze coins dated for AD 253–282 and found north of what is now the town centre. Under Agricola the road–building programme included a route from the fort at Manchester (Mamucium) to the fort at Ribchester (Bremetennacum) which ran through Radcliffe and Affetside. The modern Watling Street, which serves the Seddons Farm estate on the west side of town, follows the approximate line of the Roman road.

This page was last edited on 7 February 2018, at 18:02.
Reference: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bury under CC BY-SA license.

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