Otter

Fischotter, Lutra Lutra.JPG
Amblonyx
Aonyx
Enhydra
Hydrictis
Lontra
Lutra
Lutrogale
Pteronura
Enhydriodon
Algarolutra
Cyrnaonyx
Megalenhydris
Sardolutra
Siamogale
Teruelictis
Enhydritherium
Limnonyx
Lutravus
Sivaonyx
Torolutra
Tyrrhenolutra
Vishnuonyx

Otters are carnivorous mammals in the subfamily Lutrinae. The 13 extant otter species are all semiaquatic, aquatic or marine, with diets based on fish and invertebrates. Lutrinae is a branch of the weasel family Mustelidae, which also includes badgers, honey badgers, martens, minks, polecats, and wolverines.

The word otter derives from the Old English word otor or oter. This, and cognate words in other Indo-European languages, ultimately stem from the Proto-Indo-European language root *wódr̥, which also gave rise to the English word "water".

An otter's den is called a holt or couch. Male otters are called dogs or boars, females are called bitches or sows, and their offspring are called pups. The collective nouns for otters are bevy, family, lodge, romp (being descriptive of their often playful nature) or, when in water, raft.

The feces of otters are typically identified by their distinctive aroma, the smell of which has been described as ranging from freshly mown hay to putrefied fish; these are known as spraints.

The gestation period in otters is about 60 to 86 days. The newborn pup is cared for by the bitch, dog and older offspring. Bitch otters reach sexual maturity at approximately two years of age and males at approximately three years. The holt is built under tree roots or a rocky cairn, more common in Scotland. It is lined with moss and grass.

This page was last edited on 20 May 2018, at 17:19.
Reference: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Otter under CC BY-SA license.

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